The Subclavian Line: The Resuscitation Line of Champions

The Subclavian Line: The Resuscitation Line of Champions

Which central venous catheter (CVC) is best for our patients? Is it the internal jugular (IJ), subclavian, or femoral? We all have our go-to, which I would argue for most, is the ultrasound (US) guided IJ. But is that what is best? Is it recommended by our medical societies? To answer this question we dive into the literature . . . I think you’ll be surprised by what we find. (Hint: it’s the Subclavian!!)

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Echo Extravaganza Part 2: Unlocking the Apical Four Chamber view

Echo Extravaganza Part 2:  Unlocking the Apical Four Chamber view

The apical four chamber view is a key window in obtaining the bedside echo as it helps assess both the size and function of the atria, and ventricles. Window shopping for this view can be tricky, however, as there are specific requirements for probe orientation. In this blog post and video, Dr. Christina Wilson helps us understand the subtleties of this window and how to troubleshoot for the perfect four chamber view.

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Feature Film - Window to the Heart- Point of Care Echocardiography

Feature Film - Window to the Heart- Point of Care Echocardiography

We apologize that it has been so long since our last blog post . . . we were busy preparing for our annual Winter Symposium. What a fantastic year it was! It included an amazing point of care echocardiography extravaganza by the course’s ultrasound faculty. We covered core content, the 5 E’s of echocardiography, mastering the suprasternal notch, unlocking the apical four chamber view and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion … phew! We are excited to roll out this content to you over the coming weeks, starting with Dr. Kring’s core content on point of care echocardiography.

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ARE YOU POSITIVE . . . OR FALSE POSITIVE? IMPROVING YOUR INTERPRETATION OF THE EFAST EXAM

ARE YOU POSITIVE . . .  OR FALSE POSITIVE? IMPROVING YOUR INTERPRETATION OF THE EFAST EXAM

The EFAST exam is an integral component of an emergency provider’s trauma evaluation. In the right hands, it has a specificity > 90% for intra-abdominal free fluid. There are some pitfalls, however, that can trick the provider into thinking a false positive represents free fluid. In this post, Dr. Gill and Dr. Kring help us improve our EFAST interpretation and recognize these “fake-outs.”

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Analgesics in the ED: What Works, What Doesn’t

Analgesics in the ED: What Works, What Doesn’t

Prompt, safe, and effective pain management is a core competency of the emergency provider. Unfortunately, traditional strategies for administering analgesics for acute pain have shown poor success rates. In this podcast episode, Dr. Matthew Delaney shares a few evidence based pain management pearls you can use on your next shift.

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Feature Film - Is There Evidence Behind the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

Feature Film - Is There Evidence Behind the Management of Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes and affects ~65,000 patients annually in the US. The diagnosis may not be complicated, but the optimal treatment strategy can be a moving target. What is the current recommended blood pressure to limit hematoma expansion? Should we reverse anti-platelet medications? How about seizure prophylaxis? In this feature film, Dr. Siket reviews the evidence behind the optimal management of spontaneous ICH.

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Journal Club April 2018 - Nephrolithiasis

Journal Club April 2018 - Nephrolithiasis

April’s journal club looked at four clinical questions regarding the diagnosis and expectant course of renal stones. Can the STONE score help you determine if your patient’s flank pain is due to a renal stone? Which is better to confirm your clinical suspicion of a renal stone, ultrasound or CT? How likely will your patient’s kidney stone pass spontaneously? What is the accuracy of hematuria to predict a renal stone in the patient with flank pain?

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