Journal Club September 2017 - Angioedema

Journal Club September 2017 - Angioedema

Angioedema (non-pitting edema of submucosal tissues) results in infrequent, but high-risk emergency department visits. Since airway edema can make oropharyngeal and nasopharyngeal intubation impossible, our focus is on early and aggressive pharmacologic treatment to prevent life threatening airway obstruction. Recall that angioedema can come from two broad physiologic mechanisms: histamine mediated (ie allergic in nature which may have urticaria or other evidence of anaphylaxis) or bradykinin mediated (eg hereditary angioedema, ACE-induced angioedema). Histaminergic mediated typically responds well to aggressive antihistamines, steroids, and epinephrine. Bradykinin mediated, however, does not.  This month we focused on this type of angioedema that can be non-responsive to our typical first line therapies. 

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Feature Film: D-dimer, Wells, PERC... Pitfalls of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis

Feature Film:  D-dimer, Wells, PERC... Pitfalls of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis

Dr. Ali Raja is the co-author for American College of Emergency Physicians and the American College of Physicians guidelines committee for pulmonary embolism.  He was also voted the most outstanding speaker for our 2017 Maine Medical Center Winter Symposium.  We chose to highlight his lecture - "D-dimer, Wells, PERC rule - Pearls and Pitfalls of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis" as our next feature film.  In this lecture, Dr. Raja shares some pearls and pitfalls on the various tools at our fingertips for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. 

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Lungs are Sometimes Better Seen than Heard

Lungs are Sometimes Better Seen than Heard

An old mentor of mine liked to say "sometimes lungs are better seen than heard."  While he was referring then to good old fashioned chest xray, current literature clearly supports the use of bedside ultrasound as a valuable tool in evaulating the dyspneic patient.  In this lecture, Dr. Jacob Avila discusses the use of the bedside ultrasound in detecting pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, congestive heart failure, and pneumothorax. 

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What do you want to be when you grow up?

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Wondering which fork in the road to take after your emergency medicine residency? Interested in academics, but would also love to find that sweet job with surf just down the street?  We were fortunate to have a parade of stars for our 2017 emergency medicine career day.  Take a look to find help on buffing your CV, finding your fellowship, evaluating an academic career, or critiquing a contract for a private group. 

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Journal Club August 2017 - Cellulitis

Journal Club August 2017 - Cellulitis

Cellulitis is commonly treated in the emergency department.  Patients who present with cellulitis incur significant health care costs and may be over-treated with antibiotics.  For our August journal club, we selected articles that would help providers avoid treatment errors that lead to high costs, unwanted side effects, overuse of antibiotics and unnecessary admissions.

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Blood Can Be Very Bad! - How to Read an Emergent Head CT

Blood Can Be Very Bad! - How to Read an Emergent Head CT

It's 3 AM and EMS brings in a patient with altered mental status found down in the local park. His glucose and vital signs are normal and there is no clear etiology on his exam.  As part of your work up, you order a CT brain to evaluate for a neurologic case.  Unfortunately, teleradiology has been taking up to 90 minutes to give an interpretation on your CT's. As the patient is taken off the scanning table, you quickly peruse his CT and wonder. . . will I be able to identify an emergent diagnosis before my friendly "neighborhood" radiologist?

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Sim Cliff Notes - SEPTEMBER 2017

Sim Cliff Notes - SEPTEMBER 2017

Every month we summarize our simulation cases. No deep dive here, just the top 5 takeaways from each case.  This month's cases included anaphylaxis, PCP pneumonia, neutropenic fever, Giant Cell arteritis and Polymalgia Rheumatica. 

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The 2-hr Acetaminophen Level and Other Tall Tales from our Favorite Analgesic

The 2-hr Acetaminophen Level and Other Tall Tales from our Favorite Analgesic

In this issue of Tox Talk with Tammi, Dr. Tammi Schaeffer discusses common issues regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acetaminophen toxicity: select vs universal acetaminophen toxicity screening, the utility of the sub-four hour acetaminophen level, the decreasing repeat acetaminophen level, and using NAC for the patient with an undetectable acetaminophen level. 

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